A hyper-converged infrastructure is an IT framework that combines storage, computing and networking into a single system in an effort to reduce data center complexity and increase scalability.

Hyperconverged platforms include a hypervisor for virtualized computing, software-defined storage, and virtualized networking, and they typically run on standard, off-the-shelf servers.

Multiple nodes can be clustered together to create pools of shared compute and storage resources, designed for convenient consumption.

The use of commodity hardware, supported by a single vendor, yields an infrastructure that’s designed to be more flexible and simpler to manage than traditional enterprise storage infrastructure.

For IT professionals who are embarking on data center modernization projects, hyperconvergence can provide the agility of public cloud infrastructure without relinquishing control of hardware on their own premises.

How does hyperconvergence differ from converged infrastructure?

Hyperconvergence adds deeper levels of abstraction and greater levels of automation.In a hyperconverged environment, the components can’t be separated; the software-defined elements are implemented virtually, with seamless integration into the hypervisor environment.

Converged infrastructure involves a preconfigured package of software and hardware in a single system for simplified management. But with a converged infrastructure, the compute, storage, and networking components are discrete and can be separated.

This allows organizations to easily expand capacity by deploying additional modules.